Technically, Brett Barley’s $3,000 Barrel Was Below Market Value

Technically, Brett Barley’s $3,000 Barrel Was Below Market Value

So at $10,000, assuming you’re covered up for the full 10 seconds, you’re spending a cool $5,000 to match the amount of time Brett Barley was inside the Skeleton Bay drainer he calls “the longest barrel of my life,” all thanks to the most expensive ticket of his life. “All the travel. The ticket prices.

In fact, it was the Surf Ranch itself that set the new market value for wave costs. “After an entire weekend of watching perfect waves, you’ll get your chance to join the very short list of people who have surfed Kelly’s creation.

I’m not the one who set the cost of that wave at $3,000; Barley did. “Upon arrival at the airport, I was denied check-in at the counter, and my dreams were being shattered,” Brett says about his planned trip with friend Oliver Kurtz. “Would it be worth rolling the dice and buying a very expensive replacement ticket to only get there the afternoon the swell started arriving? Should I stay home? Would I make it in time?

And I don’t mean in the sappy Mastercard commercial sense where the answer you’re supposed to give me is “priceless. ” I mean let’s discuss the actual market value for a wave so amazing the memory of it becomes an indelible shaka-shaped cattle brand on your brain…in hard figures…dollars and cents.

Read more here: The Inertia

Technically, Brett Barley’s $3,000 Barrel Was Below Market Value surf photo  Technically, Brett Barley’s $3,000 Barrel Was Below Market Value surf photo  Technically, Brett Barley’s $3,000 Barrel Was Below Market Value surf photo

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