Australian Beaches Close After Jellyfish Invasion – Over 9,000 people were stung by bluebottle jellyfish last week along the Gold and Sunshine Coasts

Lisa-ann Gershwin, director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Service told SBS News. “Some of the bluebottle sails are right-handed and some are left-handed, across the body, so when the wind comes up it only grabs the ones with the sail going the right way for that particular breeze,” she said. “It’s nature’s way of making sure the population never becomes extinct.

If you don’t like getting stung by bluebottle jellyfish, you’d be wise to stay the hell away from surfing Australia’s Queensland coast right now–this area is literally has been swarmed with those blue, slimy, sac-like invertebrates.

Apparently, these jellyfish live in a huge group in the middle of the ocean, but when the winds kick up, their sail-like crests catch the wind and blow them to shore. “When you look at a bluebottle, and you see the bubble and the blue fringes and the long blue tentacles, that is actually a colony, that is not an individual,” Dr.

Read more here: Surfer Mag

Australian Beaches Close After Jellyfish Invasion   Over 9,000 people were stung by bluebottle jellyfish last week along the Gold and Sunshine Coasts surf photo  Australian Beaches Close After Jellyfish Invasion   Over 9,000 people were stung by bluebottle jellyfish last week along the Gold and Sunshine Coasts surf photo  Australian Beaches Close After Jellyfish Invasion   Over 9,000 people were stung by bluebottle jellyfish last week along the Gold and Sunshine Coasts surf photo

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