What Cape Fear Showed Us About Big Wave Surfing’s Legitimacy Problem

What Cape Fear Showed Us About Big Wave Surfing’s Legitimacy Problem

On Monday afternoon, Stab reported that the WSL made it clear among Big Wave World Tour athletes that if they surfed in Cape Fear, they wouldn’t be allowed to compete in the BWWT.

And that the kind of exclusivity the WSL holds over its athletes makes sense for the World Championship Tour, but for the BWWT that runs two or three events in a given year with a fraction of the prize money, the same logic doesn’t apply.

But what both Albee and Mark Healey are missing is that the only way for the athletes to be adequately compensated is for the BWWT to gain the legitimacy that events like Cape Fear undermine.

The WSL wasn’t wrong to flex on this one, and hold an ultimatum over BWWT athletes heads. It makes sense.  They’re trying to professionalize big wave surfing.

A number of the athletes that compete in the BWWT aren’t sponsored, and to hold opportunities to compete for more prize money and gain more exposure against them creates a damned-if-you-do damned-if-you-don’t scenario.

Read more here: The Inertia

What Cape Fear Showed Us About Big Wave Surfing’s Legitimacy Problem surf photo  What Cape Fear Showed Us About Big Wave Surfing’s Legitimacy Problem surf photo  What Cape Fear Showed Us About Big Wave Surfing’s Legitimacy Problem surf photo

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