History Of Surfing: Paradise Lost – The valley cometh at Malibu

History Of Surfing: Paradise Lost – The valley cometh at Malibu

After a series of chapters on how Malibu gave rise to a national surfing obsession in the late-’40s, he rounds out the period with the chapter on its overcrowded demise in the late-’50s, and no surfer took a more profound blow from paradise lost than Miki Dora.

Surfing was the best thing in Dora’s life, Malibu was the best thing in surfing, and from 1955 onward, as he watched newcomers dividing and multiplying like Fantasia broomsticks in the Malibu lineup, mostly what he felt was loss and anger.

He was the first surfer to make aggression, misanthropy, and abuse fashionable. “Localism”—the sport’s homegrown form of turf-based vigilantism, introduced in late ’60s—may not have been a direct result of Dora’s rants against overcrowding at Malibu.

You see photos and film shot at Malibu in the 1940s, and guys are riding three at a time, five at a time, and you figure that’s probably half the people in the water on the same wave.

A couple years later, when Dora more or less gave up on Malibu, and when he upped his criminal game, he explored far and wide: South America, France, South Africa.

Read more here: Surfer Mag

History Of Surfing: Paradise Lost   The valley cometh at Malibu surf photo  History Of Surfing: Paradise Lost   The valley cometh at Malibu surf photo  History Of Surfing: Paradise Lost   The valley cometh at Malibu surf photo

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